Cranbrook Academy of Art
2014 [FALL] Edition Lecture Series


For the complete schedule, click here.


Cranbrook Academy of Art

2014-2015 Professional Practices Workshops & Events


Schedule coming soon.

 

Past Critical Studies Programs and Lecturers


Cranbrook Academy of Art [SPRING] Edition Lecture Series 2013

Cranbrook Academy of Art [FALL] Edition Lecture Series 2012

Cranbrook Academy of Art [SPRING] Edition Lecture Series 2012


Cranbrook Academy of Art [FALL] Edition Lecture Series 2012

Cranbrook Academy of Art [SPRING] Edition Lecture Series 2011

Cranbrook Academy of Art [FALL] Edition Lecture Series 2010


Cranbrook Academy of Art [SPRING] Edition Lecture Series 2010


Cranbrook Academy of Art [FALL] Edition Lecture Series 2009


Critical Studies / Humanities Program 2008 - 2009
Civic Engagement in Art Practice: Outside the Solo Studio


Critical Studies/Humanities Program 2007-2008
Producing Culture: Creators and Creativity in the Contemporary World


2006-2007 Critical Studies/Humanities
Size Matters: Perception at the Edge of Space


2005-2006 Critical Studies/Humanities
Nostalgia: Temporal Hybrids and Rifts


2004-2005 Critical Studies/Humanities
Resisting Monoculture


2003-2004 Critical Studies
The Nature of the Real


2003-2005 Humanities
Agents of Change

 

 

 

 

 

Critical Studies Program

Because Cranbrook is a small and graduate-only institution, the academic program at the Academy is truly unique. Both our studios and our academic programs are free from conventional classes and traditional grades.  This allows us to be specialized and flexible — responsive to student and faculty interests.  Our academic program is both rigorous and yet approachable.  The program takes the form of lectures, discussions, student-initiated symposia, critiques with visiting curators, dinners with guest thinkers and debates in the studio kitchens.  Our Academy-wide academic programs are open to all students at the Academy —regardless of their primary studio department — and are designed to foster inter-departmental exchange.


Critical Studies

Our Critical Studies program is the central piece of our academic program.  In the fall semester, we bring a visiting Critical Studies Fellow to be in residence at the Academy.  Selected for their perspectives on contemporary theory and culture studies, the visiting Fellows present public lectures, conduct student discussion groups and serve as an active presence in studio critiques and reviews. In the spring semester, the Critical Studies program continues with a new set of visitors for lectures, discussions, critiques and workshops.  These visitors are chosen each year to reflect the most current intellectual discourse within contemporary architecture, art, and design.


FALL 2014 CRITICAL STUDIES FELLOW:  Joseph Tanke

“The Audacious Idea of the Aesthetic: Entropy in Two Parts”
The theoretical discourse of aesthetics is the attempt to come to terms with the unique form of experience occasioned by works of art and exceptional aspects of the natural world, namely the so-called aesthetic experience. We will follow the development of a problematic, unstable, and potentially threatening form of experience—the very same form of experience that sustains art today. 
Joseph J. Tanke is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in Philosophy the University of Hawaii, Manoa. He has published and lectured extensively on issues in aesthetics, art theory, Continental philosophy, and the history of philosophy. Dr. Tanke is the author of Foucault’s Philosophy of Art: A Genealogy of Modernity (Continuum, 2009), and Jacques Rancière: An Introduction—Philosophy, Politics, Aesthetics (Continuum, 2011).  Dr. Tanke has recently completed (with Colin McQuillan) a major, new anthology of aesthetic theory, The Bloomsbury Anthology of Aesthetics (Bloomsbury, 2012), a textbook for courses on the philosophy of art. Additionally, Dr. Tanke researches established and emerging artists in China, producing essays for exhibitions held at major Chinese art institutions.

Dr. Tanke is currently working on a book entitled Castles in the Sky: Aesthetics as a Philosophical Discourse.  During his time at Cranbrook, Joseph will be working with students on an exhibition and writings regarding Kant’s Critique of Judgment.

 

SPRING 2015 CRITICAL STUDIES FELLOW:  Jaimey Hamilton Faris

Jaimey Hamilton Faris focuses her research around questions of material and subjective relations within our current global economic system. What is material? How limited or unlimited is its potential in the twenty-first century?  What is the artist/designer’s responsibility in addressing the earth’s materiality through their chosen medium of expression?  Inspired by the work of Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Édouard Glissant, and others, her examination of current artistic allegorizations of islands as “isolated and floating relations” (Deleuze) will offer useful accounts of translocal cultural ecologies applicable to our most pressing global ethical questions.

Jaimey Hamilton Faris is Associate Professor of Critical Theory and Contemporary Art at the University of Hawai'i Mānoa.   Her writing focuses on issues of commodity aesthetics, globalization, and translocal ethics in contemporary art, often considered through a neo-materialist lens.  She has written articles for Art JournalOctober, and In_Visible Culture, and essays for collections published by the Centre Pompidou and Oxford University Press.  Her recent book, Uncommon Goods: Global Dimensions of the Readymade (Intellect, 2013), explores contemporary art practice in response to expanding definitions of the commodity since the nineties, which now include digital information, intellectual property, labor, and management. 
While at Cranbrook, Hamilton Faris will be working on a series of essays entitled Of Islands and the In-Between in which she discusses the importance of contemporary art about islands, straits, and oceans as useful “geopoetic” imaginaries of the possible and impossible conditions of global coexistence in the twenty-first century.


Public Lecture Series

The academic program also offers a rich year-long public lecture series that includes artists and designers who are visiting our ten departments, as well as critics and scholars brought to campus by the Cranbrook Art Museum and the Critical Studies program itself. Because the Academy is not bound by a formulaic educational structure, all types of thinkers — artists, designers, philosophers, activists, historians, scientists and writers — are invited to present ways to link one’s studio practice with larger and diverse communities, national and international.
 




2014 FALL EDITION LECTURE SERIES

All lectures are held in Cranbrook Art Museum’s deSalle Auditorium and are free to ArtMembers and students with identification, and included with Museum admission for the general public. The Museum will remain open prior to each lecture. Parking is available in the Cranbrook Art Museum parking lot and in the parking deck next to the Institute of Science.
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Ave., in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.


September 12, 6pm
Lauren Kalman
Artist
“But if the Crime is Beautiful...”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Lauren Kalman will be discussing her work including her most recent project But if the Crime is Beautiful.… Her work combines functional and craft objects, sculpture, photography, video, installation and performance. Her fabricated objects reflect sculptural ornamentation and adornment and are combined with the body and design objects to produce images and videos. Her work has been featured in exhibitions at the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the Museum of Arts and Design.

September 15, 4pm                       
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “Good Luck, Bad Luck, Chance and Failure”
Mark Newport, Beverly Fishman, Bill Massie

September 16, 4pm                                                       
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “Good Luck, Bad Luck, Chance and Failure”
Heather McGill, Scott Klinker, Elliott Earls, Iris Eichenberg

September 17, 4pm                                                       
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “Good Luck, Bad Luck, Chance and Failure”
Liz Cohen, Randy Bolton, Anders Ruhwald

September 19, 4pm
Jane Lackey
Visual Artist
“Mapping Active-Passive”
Sponsored by the Warner Lecture Fund and the Fiber Department

Jane Lackey is not only a 1979 graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art, she also served as an Artist-in-Residence and Head of Fiber Department from 1997 through 2007. In her lecture at Cranbrook, Lackey will discuss influences and resources that have guided the trajectory of her work over time. Long engaged in cross-disciplinary intersections, Lackey’s artworks infuse materials and process with active thinking. Conceptual ideas are slowly traced, entwined and materialized in drawings, sculpture, and installations. Her work has been exhibited in venues including Wellcome Trust, London; Contemporary Art Space, Osaka; I Space, Chicago; Exit Art, NYC; Tang Museum, Syracuse;Detroit Institute of Arts; The Art Gym; Bellevue Art Museum; and New Mexico Museum of Art. Prior to her appointment at Cranbrook, Lackey also served as Head of the Fiber Department at Kansas City Art Institute. She is currently an independent artist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

September 21, 4pm
Shelley Selim
Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow at Cranbrook Art Museum
Scott Klinker
Designer-in-Residence for 3D Design at Cranbrook Academy of Art
“The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs: A Conversation with Shelley Selim and Scott Klinker”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Ken Isaacs’s Living Structures—hand-made, low-cost, multifunctional furniture and architectural units—challenged ideas of how people could sit, work, and live within their own homes and the broader built environment. In her curator’s talk, Shelley Selim will examine how the former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and instructor radically deconstructed conventional notions of modernism during the mid-century. Immediately afterward, Selim will be joined by Cranbrook Academy of Art 3D Designer-in-Residence Scott Klinker for a gallery discussion about the impact of Isaacs’s work on contemporary design practice.

September 25, 6pm
David Cabianca
“An Afternoon with David Cabianca”

September 28, 3pm
Geoffrey Reynolds
The Mary Riepma Ross Director of the Joint Archives of Holland at Hope College
“Plastic Fantastic: Michigan’s Boat Building Industry and the Use of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP)”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

The history of building fiberglass boats in Michigan began in the early 1950s. Like many states in the United States following WWII, Michigan began experimenting with reinforced fiberglass plastic (FRP) in the construction of many objects. From this new boat building material sprang an entire industry that provided consumers with safe, low maintenance, affordable pleasure on the water and hundreds of jobs for local craftsmen. Today, fiberglass and craftsman still come together to provide a solid economic footing for many Michigan residents.

September 29, 6pm
Pan Gongkai
Professor and President of the China Central Academy of Fine Arts
“Ink Painting as a Sample of Chinese Contemporary Art”

Prof. Pan Gongkai will discuss the growing interest in “New Ink” art both domestically and internationally. He will address the questions ink painting traditions confront today, in a time when the medium has to build relevance within today’s contemporary art practice. Pan Gongkai will present his own art practices to highlight the alternative ways he combines tradition with contemporary — contemporary installation work with ink elements, contemporary video installations presenting reflections on Chinese aesthetic mechanics behind ink painting, and ink painting practices developed from self-discipline and the evolution of tradition.

Pan Gongkai is an internationally renowned artist, theoretician, and educator. He is the current President of the China Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) in Beijing and a former president of the China Academy of Art (CAA) in Hangzhou. Melt, his recent and large-scale digital installation, was featured at the 54th Venice Biennale. Pan’s ink paintings have been exhibited in major art museums in Beijing, Hong Kong, Macau, New York, San Francisco, and Tokyo. He is the author of many publications and an active researcher. Over the last ten years, he directed a comprehensive research study on modern Chinese art, titled The Road of Chinese Modern Art, the results of which were published in 2012, and are now critically influencing Chinese scholarship on the liberal arts.

October 2, 6pm
Jacob Gaboury
Assistant Professor
“On Uncomputable Numbers: Toward a Queer History of Computing”
Sponsored by Studio Council

What makes a computer queer? This lecture advances a queer theory of computing through a set of foundational queer figures in the early history of computation and mathematics. Drawing on the long history of queer engagements with the anti-social, the negative, and the outside, Gaboury identifies queerness in the breakdown and failure of technical systems, and in theories of uncomputability first articulated by Alan Turing in the 1930s.

Jacob Gaboury is an Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Visual Culture at Stony Brook University and a staff writer for the art and technology organization Rhizome at the New Museum for Contemporary Art.

October 5, 4pm
Eric Shiner
Director of The Andy Warhol Museum
“Andy Warhol and His World”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Eric Shiner is the Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, the most comprehensive single-artist museum in the world, located in Pittsburgh, Penn. At The Warhol Museum, Shiner organized Factory Direct: Pittsburgh, an exhibition that showcased the artwork of 14 established contemporary artists invited to conduct artist residencies in Pittsburgh-based factories. In addition, Shiner led The Warhol team in creating Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal, the largest traveling exhibition of Warhol artwork in Asia, as well as the first retrospective of appropriation artist Deborah Kass, titled Before and Happily Ever After.

Shiner is a scholar of contemporary Japanese art and a leading authority on Andy Warhol. He received a Bachelor of Philosophy in The History of Art & Architecture and Japanese Language & Literature from The University of Pittsburgh Honors College in 1994, an M.A. in The History of Art from Osaka University in 2001, and an M.A. in The History of Art from Yale in 2003.

October 7, 6pm
Joseph Tanke
Associate Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in Philosophy
“Part One: Classical Aesthetics”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

The first lecture as part of Joseph Tanke’s Critical Studies residential fellowship will examine the very idea of the aesthetic as it was first constituted within classical German philosophy. It is proposed that this word, “aesthetics,” is used far too expansively in contemporary discussions of art and culture, and that it is in fact best reserved for naming the interdisciplinary conversation in philosophy, literary theory, art theory, and the sciences inaugurated by the publication of Alexander Baumgarten’s Aesthetica in 1750.

Tanke is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in Philosophy the University of Hawaii, Manoa. He has published and lectured extensively on issues in aesthetics, art theory, Continental philosophy, and the history of philosophy.

October 8, 6pm
Be Original Americas Panel Discussion
(Rob Kirkbride, Joseph Connell, Felicia Ferrone, Scott Klinker, Clark Malcolm, Antoine Roset)
“Nuts, Bolts and Creativity: A look at the Work that Goes into Original Design”
Sponsored by Be Original Americas

Rob Kirkbride, Senior Editor for The Monday Morning Quarterback, delves into the hard work, time, effort and money that goes into creating truly original design, reinforcing the idea that original design does not come "free" and therefore isn't free to steal! His esteemed panelists will be Joseph Connell, Principal, Perkins+Will (Chicago); Felicia Ferrone, Principal of fferrone design and independent curator and educator; Scott Klinker, Designer-in-Residence at Cranbrook Academy of Art; Clark Malcolm, Writer/Editor for Herman Miller; and Antoine Roset, Executive Vice President, Ligne Roset/Roset USA and Vice President and Charter Member of Be Original Americas.

Formed in 2012, Be Original Americas is an association of like-minded consumers, design professionals, educators, institutions, and businesses who recognize the critical importance of original design and are committed to the protection of its consumers and authors. Together they seek to inform, educate, and influence — promoting the vital social and economic interests that are inherently linked to the integrity of authentic design.

October 12, 4pm
Gregory Wittkopp
Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Center for Collections and Research
Iris Eichenberg
Artist-in-Residence and Head of Metalsmithing at Cranbrook Academy of Art
“Studio to Factory: Paul Evans’s (Eight-Month) Education at Cranbrook”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Although brief, the time Paul Evans spent as a student in the studios of Cranbrook Academy of Art—his final year of formal education—was a formative chapter in his life. It was at Cranbrook that he was exposed to the world of art outside the realm of metalsmithing, and where he began to develop a style that was as indebted to contemporary currents in the fields of painting, sculpture, and ceramics as it was to the Scandinavian tradition of metalsmithing that he had honed at the School for American Craftsmen in Rochester. While several more years would pass before he developed the sculpted and faceted furniture that defined his career, it was at Cranbrook that this direction began to take form.
Following the lecture, join Gregory Wittkopp and Iris Eichenberg in the galleries as they engage in a conversation about Paul Evans’s work.

October 14, 6pm
Todd Shalom
Director/Founder of Elastic City
“Elastic City and the Participatory Walk”
Sponsored by Studio Council

Todd Shalom works with text, sound, and image to re-contextualize the body using vocabulary of the everyday. Shalom will discuss poetic decision making, how artists adapt to the walk form, and how Elastic City plays with its own form as a method of survival. Todd Shalom is the founder and Director of Elastic City. Todd’s work has been presented by organizations such as Abrons Art Center, Creative Time, ISSUE Project Room, The Kitchen, The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum, P.S.122 and Printed Matter. He is a graduate of the MFA Writing Program at California College of the Arts and also holds a BS in Business Administration from Boston University. Todd is a member of the core faculty in Pratt Institute's MFA in Writing program.

October 16, 7pm
Joel Stone
Senior Curator of the Detroit Historical Society
“Boom Town: Detroit in the Roaring ‘20s”
Co-sponsored by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and the Detroit Historical Society

From the dust and smoke of the nineteenth century, Detroit burst into the national spotlight in the early twentieth century. The automobile business was at full throttle, resulting in a city that grew faster than any other on the continent. Adding to the excitement and intrigue, national Prohibition created a demand for alcohol that our Canadian neighbors gladly addressed. Rum running became the region’s second largest industry. Conventions loved Detroit, and so did organized crime. Boom Town met the Wild West.

October 26, 4pm             
Gerhardt Knodel
Artist
“Let The Games Begin!”
Co-sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and Wasserman Projects

The field of textiles, once relatively isolated, now is a ubiquitous medium freely used in all disciplines of art. Knodel has worked through that history, and in a new body of work he is probing fresh associations with the textile medium in relation to contemporary issues and its opportunity to function in this time as an agent of change.

Following a long and eventful journey at Cranbrook Academy of Art where he was head of the Fiber Department (1970-1995) and Director of the Academy (1995-2007), Knodel returned to full-time studio practice in 2008. A selection of his new work will be on display at Wasserman Projects from September 20 through November 7, 2014.

October 28, 6pm
David Jablonowski
Artist
“Stone Carving High Performance”
Sponsored by the Metalsmithing and Sculpture Departments

The lecture will follow a format which brings together the work and thinking process of sculptor and installation artist David Jablonowski. Jablonowski (born in Bochum, Germany in 1982) artistically examines the surface and the evolution of contemporary communication technologies. In the form of sculptures, videos, and installations, he focuses on the development of language as a technically reproducible code and aesthetic production with regard to the communication of knowledge and information. Based in Amsterdam, artist David Jablonowski held large-scale solo exhibitions at venues such as BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, UK; Kunstverein Muenster, Germany; Gemeente Museum Den Hague, The Netherlands; and Dallas Contemporary, Dallas Texas.

October 30, 6pm
Giulio Cappellini
Designer
“Cappellini Dream”
Sponsored by the 3D Department + Haworth Inc.

Giulio Cappellini is director of the world-famous Italian furniture manufacturer Cappellini. The Milanese architect has worked since 1979 with the spirit and the aims of a man in continuous renewal. Over the years, his work has become the designer’s choice in contemporary design, both for bringing his brand name into the world, and as art director of other important design brands. Cappellini’s more important project, the “company,” transformed Cappellini into one of the biggest “trend setters” worldwide.

November 4, 6pm
Chris Tysh
“An Evening with Chris Tysh”

November 6, 7pm
Portia Vescio
Assistant Director of the University Archives at Michigan State University
“Scandals, Scalawags and (Un) Savory Stories”
Co-sponsored by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections

We all love our alma maters, but how well do we really know them? Using documents and photographs, archivist Portia Vescio recalls some of the more scandalous people and events from Michigan State University’s history. From students in open rebellion to undercover Pinkerton agents, these stories show how the college overcame adversity and how sometimes a bad situation turned into a beautiful friendship.

November 7, 4pm
John Underkoffler
Founder of Oblong Industries, Inc.
“An Afternoon with John Underkoffler”

November 11, 6pm
Joseph Tanke
Associate Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in Philosophy
“Part Two: Contemporary Aesthetics”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

This second lecture as part of the Critical Studies residential fellowship will unfold as a critical overview of the various ways in which the idea of the aesthetic has recently been appropriated for different ethical and political projects. While Tanke will explain how these strategies were to some degree marked out by Kant’s Critique of Judgment (1790), or anticipated by Friedrich Schiller’s Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Mankind (1795), our attention will be directed at the recent arguments found in the writings of Jean-François Lyotard and Jacques Rancière. Joseph J. Tanke is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in Philosophy the University of Hawaii, Manoa. He has published and lectured extensively on issues in aesthetics, art theory, Continental philosophy, and the history of philosophy.

November 13, 7pm
Frank Boles
Director of Central Michigan University’s Clarke Historical Library
“Up North with the Hemingways”
Co-sponsored by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University

In 1899, Dr. Clarence Hemingway and his wife Grace Hall Hemingway purchased property on Walloon Lake near Petoskey and constructed a summer cottage. Their son Ernest would make the people who lived in and near the cottage, as well as the surrounding lakes and communities, internationally famous through the stories and books he wrote. But before he won the Nobel Prize for Literature, and before he published his first story, “Ernie” spent all of his summers “Up North” as just another summer person with his family, the Hemingways. Listen to the fascinating stories of those simple, family summers, as well as more about the “Up North” experience the family lived from 1900 to 1921.

November 16, 4pm
Shanna Merola
Photographer and Social Activist
"Bearing Witness: Art as Activism"
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum in collaboration with Cranbrook Institute of Science and the exhibition Women of Vision: National Geographic's Photographers on Assignment.

Shanna Merola is an artist committed to grassroots activism and the role that photography plays in creating social justice. In her lecture, Merola will share images from her recent assignment in Ferguson, Missouri, where she documented the heightened militarization of Mike Brown’s neighborhood as the community rallied to protest the response of the police. Images of armored vehicles in residential areas and police in riot gear hold a striking resemblance to Merola’s previous body of work “Black Day in July,” based on the Detroit Rebellion of 1967. She will make connections between the two uprisings, including interviews with Detroit residents who experienced the events of 1967 firsthand.

Shanna Merola is an artist, photographer, and political activist. In 2011, she graduated from Cranbrook Academy of Art with an MFA in Photography. She lives and works in Detroit, Michigan, where she teaches at the College for Creative Studies and is the Legal Observer Coordinator for the National Lawyers Guild, Detroit Chapter. Merola will also explore her work with the National Lawyers Guild.

November 18, 6pm
Lane Relyea
Writer and Educator
“How Flextimers and Networkers Have Re-shaped the Institution of Art”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

As with other professionals, artists have been lured into social life as the social itself has become increasingly ensnared within the logic of labor valuation and economic exchange — that is, as services and short-term contracts have shifted emphasis away from factory jobs and commodity production and onto individual “human capital” and its improvised, on-demand performances. As a result, the art world today develops beyond a formerly dominant system comprised of the studio, gallery, and museum. The new system of standardization is what this lecture will address — a system that dictates conformity in the production, distribution and reception of not art objects but rather of artists themselves and the limits and expectations guiding their interaction. Relyea teaches in the Department of Art Theory & Practice at Northwestern University and is the editor-in-chief of Art Journal. He has written widely on contemporary art since 1983, and his book Your Everyday Art World, which explores the effects of communication networks on artistic practice and its contexts, was published last year by MIT Press.

December 9, 6pm
Anthony Byrt
Director of Research at Auckland’s Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design
“Clammy Pipes, and Other First World Problems”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Since leaving Michigan last year after a Critical Studies Fellowship at Cranbrook Academy of Art, Detroit has been nagging at Anthony Byrt — so much so that he decided to write about it in his forthcoming book that examines the impact of globalization on contemporary New Zealand art. In this lecture, Anthony will focus on the work of New Zealand photographer Yvonne Todd, framing it in relation to questions of suburbia and monstrosity. The lecture will deal with sex, cars, passive-aggressive teenagers, Mike Kelley and Matthew Barney, and end up either on Auckland's North Shore, or somewhere south of 8 Mile, or both — two sides, Byrt will argue, of the same modern coin.

Byrt is a New Zealand art writer and currently the Director of Research at Auckland’s Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design, where he oversees the Critical Studies components of the MFA program.

 


PAST LECTURES

2014 SPRING EDITION LECTURE SERIES

All lectures are held in Cranbrook Art Museum’s deSalle Auditorium and are free to ArtMembers and students with identification. For the general public, they are included with Museum admission. Parking is available in the Cranbrook Art Museum parking lot and in the parking deck next to the Institute of Science. To download a PDF of the lecture series, click here.

Tuesday, January 21, 6pm
Francis Halsall
Spring 2014 Critical Studies Fellow
Object Oriented Aesthetics and the Re-Materialization of the Art Object
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Francis Halsall is a Lecturer in the History/Theory of Modern & Contemporary Art at National College of Art and Design, Dublin where he is director (with Declan Long) of MA Art in the Contemporary World. His research practice is situated across three main areas, the history, theory and practice of modern and contemporary art, philosophical aesthetics, and Systems-Thinking. He has published widely in both academic and more informal styles and catalogue essays, as well as participated in numerous public talks and discussions in all three areas. Francis Halsall is currently completing a short book called “Systems Aesthetics” and a major research project and book on Niklas Luhmann’s aesthetics.


Thursday, January 23, 6pm
Laura Mott
Curator of Contemporary Art and Design at Cranbrook Art Museum
An Ecstatic Introduction: Laura Mott on Practice and Exhibitions
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Cranbrook Art Museum’s new Curator of Contemporary Art and Design, Laura Mott, will speak about her curatorial methodology, previous exhibitions, and current research. After the lecture, join us for informal conversation and a cash bar in the Hartmann Gallery.

Previous to her current position at the Cranbook Art Museum, Laura Mott spent the last four years based in Sweden, where she worked as a Curator of Exhibitions at the University of Gothenburg, as well as a guest curator at Gothenburg Konsthall and Iaspis in Stockholm. Her previous professional experience was cultivated by positions at Mission 17 in San Francisco, Peter Freeman Gallery in New York City and the Whitney Museum of American Art, where she worked with curator Lawrence Rinder on the 2002 Whitney Biennial. She received her M.A. in Curatorial Studies from Bard College and BFA/BA dual degree in Art History and Fine Art from the University of Texas. She was a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Gothenburg from 2009-2013, and has taught courses at Dômens Academy of Art in Gothenburg, The Institute of Contemporary Art in Moscow and The Academy of Fine Art in Prague. In 2013, she was an invited participant of the Nordic Curator’s Caucus in Reykjavik, Iceland.


Sunday, January 26, 4pm
Shoshana Resnikoff
Collections Fellow, Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research
“Quite the Pet of Cranbrook”: James Scripps Booth and the Early Car
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Join Shoshana Resnikoff as she explores how James Scripps Booth’s early automotive designs still impact the way we drive today. From cycle cars that Booth tested out on the hills of Cranbrook, to light, luxurious vehicles for Detroit’s young movers-and-shakers, Booth played an important role in the history of the automobile.

Shoshana Resnikoff is the Collections Fellow for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and the curator of the exhibition A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car. A native of Northern California, she graduated in 2012 with her MA in American Material Culture from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture at the University of Delaware. She has worked at the Chicago History Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and received her BA from Emory University.


Tuesday, January 28, 6pm
Matthew Brannon
Artist
Not Not Asking
Sponsored by the Print Media Department

Matthew Brannon is an American artist living and working in New York City. Born in 1971, in St. Maries, Idaho, Brannon studied visual arts, art theory and psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles and received a Masters of Fine Arts from Columbia University in New York. Matthew Brannon has been the subject of numerous one-person exhibitions, including Department Store at Night (Five Impossible Films, I), Marino Marini Museum, Florence, Italy; A question answered with a quote, Portikus, Frankfurt, Germany; Mouse Trap, Light Switch, Museum M, Leuven, Belgium; Where We Were, Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, New York; and Try and Be Grateful, Art Gallery of York University, Toronto.


Monday, February 3, 6pm
Jana Kinsman and Katherine Walker
Quite Strong, Design Collective
An Evening with Jana Kinsman and Katherine Walker
Sponsored by the 2D Department


Tuesday, February 4, 6pm
Laura Heyman
Artist
An Evening with Laura Heyman
Sponsored by the Alumni Circle

Join Laura Heyman as she discusses recent and ongoing projects, investigating the way photography integrates and records the exchange of power and performance that take place when a subject stands before the camera.

Heyman’s work has been exhibited at Luggage Store Gallery, San Francisco, CA, Deutsches Polen Institute, Darmstadt, DE, Ampersand International Arts, San Francisco, CA, Senko Studio, Viborg, DK, Silver Eye Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA, The Palitz Gallery, New York, NY, Light Work Gallery, Syracuse, NY, The Ghetto Biennale, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Philadelphia Photographic Arts Center, Philadelphia, PA, The Laguna Art Museum, Laguna, CA, The United Nations, New York, NY and The National Portrait Gallery, London, UK.


Sunday, February 9, 2pm
Brett Littman
Executive Director of The Drawing Center, New York
"From Lascaux to AutoCAD: A Brief History of Drawing" and book launch for My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Brett Littman is the Executive Director of The Drawing Center in New York. His lecture will speak to drawing within contemporary art practice, his institution and specific artists in the current exhibition on display at Cranbrook Art Museum: My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process. Following the lecture, there will be a reception in the Hartmann Gallery to launch the exhibition’s new catalogue published by Cranbrook Art Museum.


Sunday, February 9, 4pm
William Wegman

Artist
An Afternoon with William Wegman
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Although William Wegman may be best known as a photographer for his creative compositions involving dogs—primarily his own Weimaraners in various costumes and poses—his career as an artist is much more varied and complex. Coming of age in the 1960s, Wegman was among the first generation to embrace conceptual art and video and by the early 1970s his work was being exhibited in museums and galleries internationally. Wegman will discuss his career as an artist, including his newest body of work, which finds him returning to his training in the arts as a painter.

William Wegman was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, in 1943. He graduated from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1965 with a BFA in painting, then enrolled in the graduate painting and printmaking program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, receiving an MFA in 1967. After teaching at various universities, Wegman’s interests in areas beyond painting led him to photography and the then-infant medium of video. While living in Long Beach, California, Wegman acquired Man Ray, the dog with whom he began a fruitful twelve-year collaboration. A central figure in Wegman’s photography and videos, Man Ray became known in the art world and beyond for his endearing, deadpan presence. In 1972, Wegman and Man Ray moved to New York. In 1986, a new dog, Fay Ray, came into Wegman’s life; and soon thereafter another famous collaboration began, marked by Wegman’s use of the Polaroid 20-by-24-inch camera. With the birth of Fay’s litter in 1989 and her daughter’s litter in 1995, Wegman’s cast of characters grew. His photographs, videos, paintings, and drawings have been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States, including Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Orange County Museum of Art in California. Wegman lives in New York and Maine.


Tuesday, February 11, 6pm
Francis Halsall
Spring 2013 Critical Studies Fellow
Systems Aesthetics
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Francis Halsall is a Lecturer in the History/Theory of Modern & Contemporary Art at National College of Art and Design, Dublin where he is director (with Declan Long) of MA Art in the Contemporary World. His research practice is situated across three main areas, the history, theory and practice of modern and contemporary art, philosophical aesthetics, and Systems-Thinking. He has published widely in both academic and more informal styles and catalogue essays, as well as participated in numerous public talks and discussions in all three areas. Francis Halsall is currently completing a short book called “Systems Aesthetics” and a major research project and book on Niklas Luhmann’s aesthetics.


Sunday, February 16, 4pm
Josephine Shea and Shoshana Resnikoff
Waylande Gregory: From Multiples to Monuments
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Join Josephine Shea and Shoshana Resnikoff as they explore the opposite ends of the work of ceramist Waylande Gregory. The first ceramic sculptor in residence at Cranbrook and an important early figure in twentieth-century American ceramics, Gregory’s work ran the gamut from production works that he paradoxically called “unique multiples” to monumental ceramic commissions for the Works Progress Administration and other federal New Deal programs. From multiples to monuments, Waylande Gregory’s work helped to shape the landscape of American ceramics.

Josephine Shea is Curator of Edsel and Eleanor Ford House and holds an MA in the history of decorative arts from The Smithsonian Associates/Corcoran College of Art + Design. Shoshana Resnikoff is the 2012 – 2014 Collections Fellow for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and served as the venue coordinator for the traveling exhibition Wayland Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impluse, which remains on view through March 30. A native of Northern California, she graduated in 2012 with her MA in American Material Culture from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture at the University of Delaware.


Sunday, February 23, 3pm
Strauss Deconstructed

Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings

Join us for "Strauss Deconstructed," a performance of Richard Strauss, "Suite for Winds, Op. 4" performed by the Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings Ensemble (DCWS), with Third Rail (DCWS Young Ensemble-in-Residence).

This is a new collaboration between Cranbrook Art Museum and the Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings Ensemble, and also a new type of concert performance which gives the audience a chance to “stand at the conductor’s podium.” The first half of the concert will be an interactive exchange among the audience, musicians, and the conductor. The second half of the concert will feature a performance of the “deconstructed” work. The concert also will include a world premiere of a new work performed by Third Rail.

At 2:15pm, there will be a “Concert Preview,” with additional works performed by Third Rail along with students from DCWS education and outreach programs. Audience members are welcome to arrive at 2pm for the “Concert Preview” or 3pm for the Strauss Deconstructed performance.

Tickets:$25 regular, $22 senior, $10 student (All tickets are $5 more at the door)
Available by calling the DCWS Box Office at 248-559-2095 or www.detroitchamberwinds.org.


Thursday, February 27, 6pm
Kevin de Laplante
Host of “The Critical Thinker” podcast
Sponsored by the 2D Department


Tuesday, March 4, 6pm
Nicole Archer
Assistant Professor, San Francisco Art Institute
Phillip Warner Lecture in Fiber
Sponsored by the Sculpture and Fibers Department

How do images and acts of hooding offer the opportunity to consider the many ways that ‘the textile’ works to produce and maintain the limits of legitimate versus illegitimate state violence? Archer will discuss this and more in her lecture.

Nicole Archer is an Assistant Professor at the San Francisco Art Institute, Nicole Archer researches contemporary art and material culture, with an emphasis in modern textile and garment histories. She also concentrates on critical and psychoanalytic theory, corporeal feminism, and performance studies.


Sunday, March 9, 4pm
Francis Halsall
Spring 2013 Critical Studies Fellow
No Chaos Damn It: Fractals, Nature and Chaos
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

In 1950, Time magazine ran a story referring to Jackson Pollock's painting as "choas" - prompting Pollock to telegraph the angry reply: "NO CHAOS DAMN IT!" Using our current exhibition The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos and the Materiality of Thinking as a starting point, Halsall will consider Pollock's claim and offer speculations as to what theories of systems, chaos, and complexity might mean for understanding nature, art, and aesthetics.

Francis Halsall is a Lecturer in the History/Theory of Modern & Contemporary Art at National College of Art and Design, Dublin where he is director (with Declan Long) of MA Art in the Contemporary World. His research practice is situated across three main areas, the history, theory and practice of modern and contemporary art, philosophical aesthetics, and Systems-Thinking. He has published widely in both academic and more informal styles and catalogue essays, as well as participated in numerous public talks and discussions in all three areas. Francis Halsall is currently completing a short book called “Systems Aesthetics” and a major research project and book on Niklas Luhmann’s aesthetics.


Tuesday, March 11, 6pm
Bertjan Pot
Knoll Lecture in Design
Sponsored by the 3D Department

Bertjan Pot is a designer, probably best known for his Random Light (1999). The light started as a material experiment, which is basically the start of each product created by Studio Bertjan Pot. The outcome is usually an interior product showing a fascination for techniques, structures, patterns and colors. Most experiments start quite impulsively by a certain curiosity for how things would function or how something would look. From there Pot takes on challenges with manufacturers to explore possibilities and push the boundaries a bit. The reward for each challenge is a new one.

The Knoll Lecture in Design at Cranbrook Academy of Art was established in 2004 by Knoll Inc., the internationally-renowned workplace and residential furnishings company founded by Florence Schust, an Academy graduate, and her husband Hans Knoll.


Sunday, March 23, 4pm
Shelley Selim and Special Guest Performer

John Cage: Music, Manuscripts, and Mushrooms, Revisited
Shelley Selim, Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow, Cranbrook Art Museum
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

The forty year anniversary of Music–Mushrooms–Manuscripts—a 1974 Cranbrook Art Museum exhibition of the art and music of John Cage—occurs in concert with My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, which features several works by the artist-composer. To celebrate Cage’s continuing resonance at Cranbrook, the Museum has organized a local musician’s live performance of the Cage composition Sounds of Venice, as well as a lecture by Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow Shelley Selim discussing Cage’s 1974 visit to Cranbrook and his works currently on display. Cage’s Mushroom Book, represented in both of the aforementioned exhibitions, will also be featured in its entirety for one afternoon at the Museum.

Shelley Selim received her Masters of the Arts in the History of Decorative Arts and Design from the program jointly administered by Parsons the New School for Design and the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, in New York City. Her research at the Cooper-Hewitt addressed twentieth-century European and American design, with a focus on Scandinavian design and its reception in America. Prior to joining Cranbrook in September 2013, Shelley taught at Parsons and was an exhibition project manager at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York.


Monday, March 24, 6pm
Lenka Clayton
Artist
An Evening with Lenka Clayton
Sponsored by the Fiber department

Lenka Clayton’s work considers, exaggerates and alters the accepted rules of everyday life, extending the familiar into the realms of the poetic and absurd. She has hand-numbered 7,000 stones; searched for all 613 people mentioned in a single edition of a German newspaper; filmed one person of each age from 1 to 100, and reconstituted a lost museum from a sketch on the back of an envelope. Her work has been shown internationally at numerous sites including; The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh - FRAC, Paris - Kunsthalle St. Gallen, Switzerland - Anthology Film Archives, New York - Galerie für Landschaftskunst, Hamburg . She holds an MA in Documentary Direction from the National Film & Television School in England and a BA in Fine Art from Central St. Martins, London.


Tuesday, March 25, 6pm
Charles Spurrier
Artist
An Evening with Charles Spurrier
Sponsored by Studio Council


Thursday, March 27, 6pm
Vanessa Place INC
Conceptual Poet and CEO of Vanessa Place INC
Empire Aesthetics: It's not the point, it's the platform
Co-Sponsored by MOCAD and the Critical Studies and Humanities program

According to Place, in our current age of global “semiocapitalism,” there is no point to the art object beyond its function as a platform for trading signifiers and signification. She says, “this might be good news; we shall see.”

Vanessa Place is the CEO of VanessaPlace Inc., the world's first poetry corporation whose sole mission is to design and manufacture objects to meet the poetic needs of the human heart, face, and form. "Your desires are our needs."

Vanessa Place will perform at MOCAD on Friday, March 28 at 7pm. For more information, please visit www.mocadetroit.org.


Sunday, March 30, 2014, 4pm
Carolee Schneemann
Utterly Precarious: A Master Class- A Film Featuring Carolee Schneemann
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum

Due to an unforeseen medical complication, Carolee Schneemann has canceled her upcoming appearance at Cranbrook Art Museum this Sunday, March 30.

She sends her regrets, and has personally sent us a copy of her film "Utterly Precarious: A Master Class," an intensive and lively exchange between Schneemann and undergraduate students at the University of Pennsylvania, filmed within the remarkable walls of The Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. The film was sent from Schneemann through her P·P·O·W Gallery in New York.

The film will be shown in deSalle Auditorium on Sunday, March 30 at 4pm.

We apologize for the inconvenience, and welcome you to come see the film and Schneemann's iconic Meat Joy, part of the current exhibition My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process. March 30 is the closing day of the exhibition.


Wednesday, April 2, 6pm
Shary Boyle
Artist
The Projected Body in Porcelain
Sponsored by the Painting and Ceramics programs


Tuesday, April 8, 6pm
Fritz Karch
An Evening with Fritz Karch
Sponsored by the Metalsmithing Department


Thursday, April 10, 6pm
Enrico Riley
Artist
An Evening with Enrico Riley
Sponsored by Studio Council


Tuesday, April 15, 6pm
Guna Nadarajan
Dean of the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design at the University of Michigan
An Evening with Guna Nadarajan
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities program

Guna Nadarajan is a curator, author and researcher working at the intersection of the arts, science and technology. He is currently the dean of the Penny W, Stamps School of Art and Design at the University of Michigan. He was previously at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) where he was vice provost for research and dean of graduate students.


Tuesday, April 22, 6pm
Tony Labat
Chair, MFA Programs at the San Francisco Art Institute
I Broke It and I Don't Care
Sponsored by the Photography Department

Since the seventies Tony Labat has developed a body of work in Performance, Video, Sculpture and Installation. His work has dealt with the body, popular culture, identity, urban relations, politics, and the media. He has exhibited internationally over the last 30 years, received numerous awards and grants, and his work is in many private and public collections. Recent exhibitions include Barbara Gladstone Gallery, the 11th Havana Bienale, Gallery Paule Anglim, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, and Atlanta Contemporary Arts Center. He’s currently Chair of the MFA Program at the San Francisco Art Institute. He lives and works in San Francisco.



Friday, April 25, 4pm
David Adjaye, OBE

J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture

David Adjaye OBE is recognized as a leading architect of his generation. Adjaye was born in Tanzania to Ghanaian parents and his influences range from contemporary art, music and science to African art forms and the civic life of cities. In 1994 he set up his first office, where his ingenious use of materials and his sculptural ability established him as an architect with an artist’s sensibility and vision.

He reformed his studio as Adjaye Associates in 2000 and immediately won several prestigious commissions. In Oslo he designed the Nobel Peace Centre in the shell of a disused railway station (completed in 2005).

In the United States, Adjaye was the designer of a new home for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver (2007), two public libraries in Washington DC (2012). In 2009 a team led by Adjaye was selected to design the new $360 million Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington DC.

Adjaye Associates now has offices in London, Berlin, New York, Accra and Shanghai, with projects throughout the world.

Adjaye has taught at the Royal College of Art, where he had previously studied, and at the Architectural Association School in London, and has held distinguished professorships at the universities of Pennsylvania, Harvard and Princeton. He is currently visiting professor of architecture and design at Yale. He was awarded the OBE for services to architecture in 2007, received the Design Miami/ Year of the Artist title in 2011 and the Wall Street Journal Innovator Award in 2013.


Tuesday, April 29, 6pm

Jenni Sorkin
Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara
Ancient Modernisms
Sponsored by the Fiber Department

Sorkin will examine how weaving and its unique form of literacy served women as a vehicle for entry into important modernist debates and collaborations with their male colleagues throughout the 1940s and 1950s.

Jenni Sorkin is Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art History at University of California, Santa Barbara. She is currently completing a book manuscript, titled Live Form: Craft as Participation, which examines the confluence of gender, artistic labor, and the history of post-war ceramics from 1945 to 1975. She holds a PhD in the History of Art from Yale University, an MA in Curatorial Studies from The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College and a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2010-2011, she was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Her writing has appeared in the Art Journal, Art Monthly, NU: The Nordic Art Review, Frieze, The Journal of Modern Craft, Modern Painters, Third Text, Texte zur Kunst, and numerous exhibition catalogs.


Monday, May 5, 6pm
Gregg Pasquarelli, AIA


Gregg Pasquarelli is a Principal of SHoP Architects and SC | SHoP Construction, as well as a registered architect in the states of New York, New Jersey, and Maine. Gregg received his Master of Architecture from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, and a Bachelors of Science from Villanova’s School of Business. Gregg is a fellow of the National Academy, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Architectural League of New York.  He has served as the Saarinen Professor of Architecture at Yale University, and has also held teaching positions at Columbia University, the University of Virginia, Syracuse University, and the University of Florida. Gregg’s commitment as not only a practitioner but as an educator demonstrates his dedication to impacting his field, challenging a new generation of architects to understand that innovative and beautiful architecture, and technological proficiency are not mutually exclusive.

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2013 [FALL] Edition Lecture Series

All lectures are held in Cranbrook Art Museum’s deSalle Auditorium and are free to ArtMembers and students with identification. For the general public, they are included with Museum admission. Parking is available in the Cranbrook Art Museum parking lot and in the parking deck next to the Institute of Science.

 

September 15, 4:00 pm
Leslie Edwards
Head Archivist, Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research
“Competition, Collaboration, and Connection: Cranbrook in 1939”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in association with the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office as part of the Michigan Modern Lecture Series

Leslie S. Edwards is a historian, researcher, lecturer, and the head archivist at Cranbrook Archives. She is the author of numerous essays, including Structure and Surface: Marianne Strengell and Woven Texture and several in Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future. Her current project expands her research on Finnish textile designer Marianne Strengell, specifically her modernist projects from 1940 to 1960. Edwards recently curated From the Archives: Teaching and Exhibiting Painting at Cranbrook, 1930-1970, which marked the debut of the “From the Archives” series.



September 16, 4:00 pm

Heather McGill, Anders Ruhwald, Liz Cohen
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “The Role of Research”



September 17, 4:00 pm

Randy Bolton, Beverly Fishman, Elliott Earls, Iris Eichenberg
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “The Role of Research”



September 18, 4:00 pm
Mark Newport, Bill Massie, Scott Klinker
Cranbrook Academy of Art Artist-in-Residence Lectures, “The Role of Research”



September 22, 4:00 pm
Craig McDonald
Director, Alden B. Dow Home and Studio
“Alden B. Dow: Midwestern Modern”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in association with the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office as part of the Michigan Modern Lecture Series

Craig McDonald is the director of the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio and the foundation representative for the Alden and Vada Dow Family Foundations. Under his direction in 2000, the Home and Studio was awarded recognition for the “preservation and care of collections” from Heritage Preservation and the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. McDonald is a past board member of the Michigan Humanities Council and the Michigan Historic Preservation Network. He is currently the board chair for the Midland Area Community Foundation.




September 23, 6:00 pm
Peter Zimmermann
Artist
“An Evening with German painter Peter Zimmerman”
Sponsored by the Painting Department

Peter Zimmermann draws inspiration from digital images, which he distorts to abstraction and recreates using numerous layers of epoxy resin, resulting in paintings and site-specific installations with overlapping, often psychedelic shapes whose glossy surfaces mirror the viewer. Zimmermann became known in the 1980s in the course of Kontext Kunst / context art.  Since 1990, he has turned his studio practice to paintings and has produced numerous exhibitions internationally, with a particular focus on major site specific works in public spaces. His lecture will touch on the experiences and implications resulting from his artistic practice, as well as why so often viewers ask to lick his paintings.



September 29, 4:00 pm
Rip Rapson
President and CEO, The Kresge Foundation
“Ralph Rapson: A Son’s Perspective of a Pioneering Modernist”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in association with the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office as part of the Michigan Modern Lecture Series

Rip Rapson, attorney and expert in urban policy, is president and CEO of The Kresge Foundation, a $3 billion national, private foundation based in metropolitan Detroit. Rapson came to Kresge in 2006 and led the now 88-year-old philanthropy in a multiyear transition to expand and recalibrate its grant making. Seven strategically focused programs emerged – Arts and Culture, Community Development, Detroit, Education, Environment, Health, and Human Services. Each seeks to influence the quality of life for those living in low-income and underserved communities. Rapson has put into practice the use of multiple funding methods, including operating support, project support, and program-related investments, in ways that extend beyond traditional grant making.



September 30, 6:00 pm
Arturo Herrera

Artist
“An Evening with Arturo Herrera”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Arturo Herrera was born in Caracas, Venezuela and lives and works in New York and Berlin, Germany. He received a BA from the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and an MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago. His work taps into the viewer’s unconscious—often intertwining fragments of cartoon characters with abstract shapes and partially obscured images that evoke memory and recollection. Using collaging techniques and fragmentation, splicing, and re-contextualization, Herrera’s work is provocative and open-ended. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in New York, Geneva, Los Angeles as well as the 2002 Whitney Biennial.



October 1, 6:00 pm
Anthony Byrt
Fall 2013 Critical Studies and Humanities Fellow
“Black Hands: Image, Masquerade and Terror in a Post-9/11 World”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Anthony Byrt is a New Zealand art writer, whose work has appeared in leading magazines such as Artforum International and frieze. He is also a contributor to the New Zealand current affairs magazine, the Listener. He is also currently the Director of Research at Auckland’s Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design, where he oversees the Critical Studies components of the MFA program, supports faculty in the development of their own research projects, and helps to build Whitecliffe’s international relationships.  Anthony lives on Waiheke Island in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf. When he’s not writing or teaching, he spends much of his spare time playing poker or chasing his 2-year-old son through rock pools.



October 6, 4:00 pm
Eric Hill
Professor of Practice in Architecture, University of Michigan
“Michigan Modern: The National Context”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in association with the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office as part of the Michigan Modern Lecture Series

Eric Hill, PhD, FAIA, is an architect based in Bloomfield Hills and a professor of practice in architecture at the University of Michigan. As a principal with Lord Aeck & Sargent Architecture in Ann Arbor he directed the Michigan Modern Preserve America grant project. Hill co-authored The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture.



October 8, 6:00 pm
Dorotheé Dupuis
Independent curator, publisher and writer, Co-director of Petunia magazine
“TOUGH LOVE: A brief reflection on the troubled relationship between reality and representation”
Sponsored by the Photography Department

Dorothée Dupuis graduated with a MA in Fine Art from HEAR Strasbourg in 2005. Following her studies she worked for French artist, Philippe Parreno, then joined Christine Macel as assistant curator at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, working on exhibitions like "Dionysiac" and "Airs de Paris". Throughout her career she has also written and curated independently, notably with non-profit space Le Commissariat that she cofounded in 2006 with other artist friends. She contributes regularly to contemporary art magazines: her texts can be read in Zérodeux, Metropolis M, Frog, Mousse, Les Archives de la Critique d'art, YEAR, and Kaleidoscope.  Since November 2012, she has been based between France and Mexico City as an independent curator. She is currently  working on different projects in Mexico City : a bi-media journal on art at the junction of the Americas, a nomadic art school based on the idea of gratuity, as well as different exhibition projects.



October 13, 4:00 pm
Dale Gyure
Professor of Architecture, Lawrence Technological University
“Serenity and Delight: The Architectural Humanism of Minoru Yamasaki”
Sponsored by Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in association with the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office as part of the Michigan Modern Lecture Series

Dale Allen Gyure, PhD, is a professor of architecture at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, Michigan, and he is an adjunct assistant professor of historic preservation at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Gyure’s research focuses on American and modern architecture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has published two books, including Frank Lloyd Wright’s Florida Southern College, as well as numerous articles and chapters. His current project is a study of Detroit modernist architect Minoru Yamasaki. Gyure serves on several boards, including the Society of Architectural Historians and the Wayne State University Minoru Yamasaki Advisory Board.



October 15, 6:00 pm
Barbara T. Smith
Artist
“Clearly”
Sponsored by the 2013 Studio Council

Barbara T. Smith studied art and comparative religions at both Pomona College and UC Irvine and is considered one of the founders of performance art.  Her early pieces took place in homes, on streets & beaches. She has been represented in historic survey exhibitions including “Whatever Happened to Sex in Scandanavia?” at Office for Contemporary Art, Oslo, Norway; “WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution”; “LA to Paris – 1955 – 1985” at Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and “Out of Actions Between Performance and the Object, 1949-1979” at MOCA Los Angeles.   Smith was recently included in several major exhibitions as part of Pacific Standard Time series including the solo exhibition, “The Radicalization of a 50’s Housewife”, at UC Irvine. She has had recent solo exhibitions at The Box Gallery, Los Angeles, CA; Galerie Parisa Kind, Frankfurt, Germany; and Maccarone Gallery, New York, NY. Her work has been reviewed in publications nationally and internationally. Smith is represented by The Box Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. 



October 20, 4:00 PM
Alfred Leslie
“Cool Man in a Golden Age”
Co-Sponsored by the Cranbrook Art Museum and Hill Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan

Alfred Leslie is a pivotal American artist, painter & filmmaker whose groundbreaking works span some sixty five years. His paintings are in private collections and major museum collections worldwide. He has received many major museum exhibitions, grants and awards. His films have been similarly acknowledged with one of them preserved in the National Film Archive.

Cranbrook Art Museum is pleased to show Alfred Leslie's tour de force film "The Cedar Bar." The film is a tumultuous free for all of a night of heavy drinking and conflicted art discussion at the "Cedar Bar". Based on a staged reading of a play by Leslie, the film features artist William De Kooning, Joan Mitchell, Helen Frankenthaler, Clement Greenburg and others. Songs are by Alfred Leslie and David Amram. The Cedar Bar played at The Lincoln Center Video Festival in NY, the London Film Festival, the Vienna Film Festival, the Tribecca Film Festival, and the Chicago Underground film Festival and many more.

This work and his 1964 film "The Last Clean Shirt" earned Alfred Leslie the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 9th Annual Chicago Underground Film Festival. The artist will be present to discuss "The Cedar" and other aspects of his multidisciplinary career.



October 23, 6:00 pm
Kate Bonansinga
Director, University of Cincinnati School of Art, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning
“Art about Place:  Contemporary Curatorial Practice in Two Regional Cities”
2013 Phillip Warner lecture Co-sponsored by the Fiber Department and the Critical Studies program

Kate Bonansinga was the founding director of Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Art at The University of Texas at El Paso where she curated dozens of exhibitions, established an undergraduate minor in museum studies, and taught courses in curatorial practice.  She is interested in museums as dynamic sites for learning, in the impact of art in gallery and non-gallery settings, and in the current methods that artists employ to make a difference in society and culture.  Bonansinga is the author of Curating at the Edge:  Artists Respond to the U.S./Mexico Border and of a chapter in Born of Resistance, edited by Scott L. Baugh and Victor Sorell.  She curated and authored the exhibition catalogue for Staged Stories: 2009 Renwick Craft Invitational at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.  Since 2002, Bonansinga has been a national art peer for the General Services Administration’s Art-in-Architecture program. She currently serves as Director, School of Art, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning at University of Cincinnati, where she is also associate professor.



October 29, 6:00 pm
Monica Gaspar
Curator, Writer, and Lecturer
“An Evening with Monica Gaspar”
Co-sponsored by Cranbrook Academy of Art and the Art Jewelry Forum

Mònica Gaspar holds an MA in Art history for the University of Barcelona and a MAS in Cultural Studies for the Institute for Cultural Studies in the Arts at the ZhdK University of the Arts, Zürich. As a free-lance curator, writer and lecturer she is involved in analyzing and discussing craft and design as critical practices. She has also specialized in contemporary jewelry, writing and lecturing at several academies and international conferences. She has recently conducted a seminar about experimental and reflective practice through craft for the ZhdK University of the Arts in Zurich, where she is currently a Research Associate at the Institute for Critical Theory. She lives and works in Zurich.




October 31, 6:00 pm
Suzan Pitt
Artist
“Suzan Pitt: Animation Art”
Co-sponsored by the 2013 Studio Council and the Academy’s Alumni Circle Committee

Suzan Pitt’s prize-winning animated films have been featured at many prestigious venues around the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, Sundance Film Festival, New York Film Festival, London Film Festival, the Ottawa International Animated Film Festival, , Morelia International Film Festival, and the Image Forum Festival in Tokyo. Her film ASPARAGUS was recently honored by The International Association of Film Animation (ASIFA) as one of the 50 best animated films of the past half century. She was honored in March 2013 with a two program retrospective of her animation films 1970-2013 at the Ann Arbor Film Festival.  Her new film PINBALL (2013) is currently being shown in many international film festivals. Suzan is a 1965 graduate of the Cranbrook Painting department.


November 5, 6:00 pm
Anthony Byrt
Fall 2013 Critical Studies and Humanities Fellow
“Frontier Spirits: Ghosts, Magic, and Colonial Half-Truths”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies and Humanities Program

Anthony Byrt is a New Zealand art writer, whose work has appeared in leading magazines such as Artforum International and frieze. He is also a contributor to the New Zealand current affairs magazine, the Listener. He is also currently the Director of Research at Auckland’s Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design, where he oversees the Critical Studies components of the MFA program, supports faculty in the development of their own research projects, and helps to build Whitecliffe’s international relationships.  Anthony lives on Waiheke Island in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf. When he’s not writing or teaching, he spends much of his spare time playing poker or chasing his 2-year-old son through rock pools.



November 7, 6:00 pm
Wesley Youssi

Founder / Creative Director of M80 Design
“More Man than Machine”
Sponsored by the 2D Design Department

Wes is an Oregon-based graphic designer and artist who draws on skateboards, old pieces of wood, and just about anything else in his field of view. He is the founder and lead creative of M80 and has worked with brands such as Random House, Nike, Signal Snowboards, & Pete Krebs. His artwork and design focuses on outsiders in America. Much, if not all, of his work is informed by his eccentric experiences with skateboarding, organized religion, and people adamant about the rules. He graduated from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2003.



November 11, 6pm
Jane Hammond
Artist, Painter, Printmaker
''An Evening with Jane Hammond"
Sponsored by the Painting Department
Special thanks to Wasserman Projects



November 14, 6:00 pm

Jean Shin
Artist
“An Evening with Jean Shin”
Sponsored by the Fiber Department

Jean Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into elegant expressions of identity and community.  Distinguished by her meticulous, labor-intensive process, and her engagement of community, Shin’s arresting installations reflect individuals’ personal lives as well as collective issues that we face as a society. Her work has been widely exhibited in major national and international museums, including in solo exhibitions at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (2010), Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington DC (2009), the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia (2006), and The Museum of Modern Art in New York (2004). Her upcoming solo exhibition will be at the Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey this Fall 2013.



November 17, 4:00 pm

Thomas Folk
Curator
“Wayland Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse”
Sponsored by the Cranbrook Art Museum

Tom Folk Ph.D., AAA, is an acknowledged scholar on American Art and regarded as the leading authority on the Pennsylvania Impressionists and published the first book on the subject in 1997. He has organized more than a dozen museum exhibitions of paintings by the New Hope Impressionists and Modernists; and, is currently working on the catalogue raisonne on Edward Redfield, the leading figure in this group. He had been the curator at the James Michener Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.
Folk has also published many articles on twentieth century American ceramic artists, including an early one on Gregory in 1994. The Gregory exhibition is his first exhibition devoted to a sculptor/ceramic artist. He currently teaches in the appraisal program at New York University, and has contributed an essay on appraising ceramics for the Appraiser Association of America's newly released Appraiser's Handbook.



November 19, 6:00 pm
Nina Samuel
Independent Curator
“My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process”
Sponsored by the Cranbrook Art Museum

Dr. Nina Samuel is the guest curator for Cranbrook Art Museum’s fall exhibitions My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process and The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot. She is an art historian and independent curator currently based in New York City. Dr. Samuel holds a PhD in Art History from Humboldt University, Berlin. After various research positions, Dr. Samuel spent the academic year 2011-2012 as Visiting Assistant Professor at the Bard Graduate Center in New York City. Drawing from more than ten years of experience as a curator in residence at the Berlin gallery for contemporary art kurt im Hirsch, the exhibition The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot was planned and curated by Dr. Samuel during that time, and both the exhibition and catalogue received a wide amount of criticism in the public press. Her PhD thesis entitled "The Shape of Chaos" investigates visual epistemologies in the field of complex dynamics and drawing as a mode of thinking, and will be published in Fall 2013. She has lectured widely nationally and internationally.



November 22, 4:00 pm                                   
New Capital
(Chelsea Culp and Ben Foch)
“NEW CAPITAL: Whole Life Vitality! Community, Collaboration, Curating, Collecting, Right Now!”
Sponsored by the 2013 Studio Council

NEW CAPITAL is the artist-curatorial team, Chelsea Culp and Ben Foch.  From 2010 to 2012 they organized regularly scheduled programming and exhibitions at 3114 W. Carroll St. in Chicago (also deemed NEW CAPITAL, for the length of its pre-determined lifespan). Their final exhibition 24HRS/25DAYS continuously programmed dozens of artists and was open to the public 24 hours a day for 25 days. After the close of the physical space, they have continued to develop special curatorial projects, in addition to making their own object-based studio work, as well as performing with the six-person band, FREE THE UNIVERSE.




December 10, 6:00 pm
Shannon Stratton
Curator and Critic
“Skilling/Deskilling”
Sponsored by the Critical Studies Program

Shannon Stratton travelled from her hometown of Alberta, Canada to Chicago in 2001 to pursue a master's degree in Fiber Art at the School of the Art Institute (SAIC). She subsequently received a master's in contemporary theory in 2008 from the SAIC, where she currently teaches in the Art History, Theory, and Criticism Department as well as the Fiber and Material Studies program. In 2010, Stratton was named one of the top 5 most vital people in the visual arts in Chicago by NewCity. And in 2011, she was a fellow of the NAMAC Visual Arts Leadership Institute and a finalist for the Chicago Community Trust Emerging Leader Award. Her curatorial projects are wide-ranging and have been presented across the country, including at: The Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland; The Glassel School of Art in Houston; and the Soap Factory in Minneapolis. With the Green Lantern Press, she founded and published Phonebook, a guide to contemporary and independent artist-run projects which is now in its third volume. Stratton was the Fall 2012 Critical Studies Fellow at Cranbrook Academy of Art.